“The fact is that relatively few photographers ever master their medium.”

“The fact is that relatively few photographers ever master their medium. Instead they allow the medium to master them and go on an endless squirrel cage chase from new lens to new paper to new developer to new gadget, never staying with one piece of equipment long enough to learn its full capacities, becoming lost in a maze of technical information that is of little or no use since they don’t know what to do with it.” – Edward Weston, Camera Craft, Vol. 37, No. 7, pp. 313-20, 1930

Edward Weston said that in 1930, but it is even more true today. With a new “improved” camera released every few months, today’s photographers are bombarded with a plethora of choices in sensor formats, mega-pixels and a multitude of other “improvements”.  Photographic equipment manufacturers are in business to sell photographic equipment, but it is up to the individual photographer to buy judiciously. Both Weston and Ansel Adams were strong proponents of mastering the “craft” of photography. Only by understanding and mastering the function of the machinery of photography can one move beyond fumbling with cameras and concentrate on visualisation and ultimately the creation of art. Continue reading “The fact is that relatively few photographers ever master their medium.”